SERVICES

If you’re experiencing a dental emergency, we’re here to help. Just walk in or give us a call.

Are you a patient of an Hosek Dentistry practice?

If you have an after-hours dental emergency, call your local office directly and connect to our emergency line.

What to do in the case of a dental emergency

Here are guidelines on how to handle common dental emergencies.

Toothache

See your dentist as soon as you feel discomfort or pain.

Broken, chipped, or cracked tooth

Rinse your mouth with warm water and apply a cold compress to your face. Go to the dentist right away. If the tooth was broken or chipped, bring the tooth fragment wrapped in wet gauze or a wet towel.

Loosened or knocked-out tooth

If your tooth becomes loose due to trauma, call your dentist. For a knocked out tooth, gently insert the lost tooth back in its socket if possible, holding the tooth by the crown using a clean washcloth. (If the tooth is dirty, first rinse the root but do not scrub it or remove any attached tissues.) If reinsertion isn’t possible, hold the tooth under the tongue and go to the dentist immediately.

Broken Jaw

Apply ice or a cold compress to the face. Go to your dentist or an emergency center immediately.

Bitten Tongue or Lip

Clean the area with a wet cloth and place a cold compress on the area to reduce swelling. If the bleeding persists or if it is excessive, go to your dentist or an emergency center.

Dental Check Up

Great oral health starts here, with a free dental exam for patients without insurance (some limitations apply*). Based on this initial exam, your dentist will create your customized dental treatment plan, which will be a guide for you and your dental team going forward in order to give you a healthy mouth.

While the services you’ll receive may vary, here’s what you can expect at your first dental checkup:

  • A review of your medical history. Tell your dentist about your diet or medications as these may impact your treatment and oral health
  • A conversation with your dentist about any concerns you have regarding your teeth, mouth, or overall oral health—we encourage you to ask questions
  • An oral exam, including a visual gum tissue check and visual oral cancer scan
  • X-rays, if necessary, to see your teeth below the gum line
  • A comprehensive treatment plan, with recommended treatment and ongoing care from your dentist

We tailor your comprehensive treatment plan, including your hygiene appointments, based on your initial exam. Treatment could begin as soon as the day following your initial exam.

Children’s Dentistry

We love seeing children at Hosek Dentistry. This is what makes us a great family dental office.

At what age should my child first visit the dentist?

“First visit by first birthday” is the recommendation of the American Academy of Pediatric Dentistry. Early visits to the dentist help to promote healthy oral habits and establish positive dental experiences for your child.

What do I tell my child about their dental visit?

Talk to your child about their dental visit in a positive way. Tell them the dentist is going to count and clean their teeth and may take pictures of their teeth. Do not tell them: “it won’t hurt”. This only gives them the idea that it could hurt. Also avoid using the words “shot”, “needle”, “pull” or “drill”. Please remember that your child has no reason to fear the dentist unless they perceive fear from you.

What will happen during my child’s first visit?

During the exam, the dentist will look at your child’s teeth and gums and check for decay. They will also evaluate your child’s bite and jaw alignment and evaluate spacing for permanent teeth. Any of your questions or concerns will be answered at this time.

In addition to the examination, digital radiographs (x-rays) may be taken to detect hidden tooth decay and to view the placement of permanent teeth.

Prophylaxis, or teeth cleaning, will also be performed. Oral hygiene instruction, including brushing and flossing will be given and ways to avoid cavities will be discussed.

Finally, fluoride will be applied to your child’s teeth to help maintain the enamel in its strongest condition.

Some children may need to be referred to a pediatric dentist for treatment for a variety of reasons. We have several pediatric dentists we work with who are wonderful!

Periodontal Disease Treatment

Periodontal disease (also called gum disease) is more common than you may think. If you’ve been diagnosed, you can rest easy knowing that the Hosek Team has extensive experience with periodontal disease and has successfully treated many patients.

  • Did you know? Over 75% of Americans suffer from periodontal disease; most don’t even know it.
    In this section, you can learn more about periodontal disease and its treatment.

According to the American Dental Association:

Periodontal treatments depend on the type of the gum disease and how severe it is. If the disease is caught early (when it is gingivitis), and no damage has been done to the supporting structures under the teeth, you may simply need a professional cleaning. The Hosek team can give you tips for improving your daily oral hygiene.

Even with these measures, some patients develop more severe periodontal disease. The first step in treating the disease usually involves a special deep cleaning called “scaling and root planing.” In this treatment, the dentist removes plaque and tartar down to the bottom of each periodontal pocket. This treatment may be done over several visits, depending on your needs.

The root surfaces of the teeth are then smoothed (or “planed”) to allow the gum tissue to heal and reattach to the teeth. This treatment also may take more than one visit.

Your dentist may recommend medications to help control infection and pain or to aid healing. These can include a pill, a mouthrinse or a medication that the dentist places directly into the periodontal pocket after scaling and root planing.
If you smoke or chew tobacco, it is important to quit. Ask your dentist or physician for information about ways to stop.

Another dental visit will be scheduled within a few weeks or months after your last scaling and root planing treatment. At this visit, your dentist or hygienist will look at your gums to see how they have healed. He or she will measure the periodontal pockets again. If the pockets have gotten deeper and the supporting bone is lost, more treatment may be needed.
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Periodontal Surgery

If the pockets do not heal enough after scaling and root planing, periodontal surgery may be needed. Surgery allows the dentist to remove tartar and plaque from hard-to-reach areas. Then the gums are stitched into place to hug the teeth tightly. Surgery can reduce pocket depth and make it easier to keep teeth clean.

If bone has been damaged by periodontal disease, surgery may be needed to rebuild or reshape the bone. Splints, bite guards or other appliances may be used to hold loose teeth in place and to help tissues heal. If too much gum or bone tissue has been lost, the dentist may do a gum or bone graft.

The dentist may place a membrane layer at the surgical area to help the gums stay in place while the tooth root reattaches to the supporting ligament. This is called “guided tissue regeneration.” After surgery, the dentist may apply a protective dressing over teeth and gums and recommend or prescribe a special mouthrinse. Your dentist also may prescribe an antibiotic and pain reliever.
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Care After Treatment

Once your periodontal treatment is completed, your dentist may recommend more frequent checkups and cleanings. Regular dental visits and deep cleanings are important to keep periodontal disease under control. In some cases, your appointments may alternate between your general dentist and periodontist.

Oral Hygiene at Home

Good oral hygiene at home also is very important to help keep periodontal disease from becoming more serious or from coming back. Daily home cleaning helps keep plaque under control and reduces tartar buildup.

  • Brush your teeth twice a day with a fluoride toothpaste.
  • Floss your teeth (or use another between-the-teeth cleaner) once a day.

You don’t have to lose teeth to periodontal disease. Brush, clean between your teeth, eat a healthy diet and visit your dentist regularly for a lifetime of healthy smiles.

Tooth Extraction

Natural teeth are ideal for biting, chewing and maintaining mouth and jawbone structure, which is why a dentist’s first priority is to help restore, save and repair your natural teeth. However, sometimes a tooth extraction is unavoidable.

Your dentists at Hosek Dentistry will make sure you’re comfortable before, during, and after your extraction procedure. This includes walking you through every step of the tooth extraction, as well as the use of local anesthetics.

Feeling uneasy about your tooth extraction? Be sure to talk to your dentist about how you’re feeling so that they can help. In addition, here are helpful tips on overcoming dental anxiety.

According to the American Dental Association:

A Few Simple Guidelines

Sometimes, teeth need to be removed due to decay, disease or trauma. Having a tooth removed or “pulled” is called a tooth extraction.
When you have an extraction, it’s natural that changes will occur in your mouth afterward. Your dentist may give you instructions to follow after the extraction, and it’s important to talk to your dentist if you have any questions or problems. Here are some general guidelines to help promote healing, prevent complications, and make you more comfortable.

Anesthetics

Before the extraction, you will be given an anesthetic to reduce your discomfort. Your mouth will remain numb for a few hours after the extraction. While your mouth is numb, you’ll want to be careful not to bite your cheek, lip or tongue. After the extraction, do not eat any foods that require chewing while your mouth is numb. The numbness should go away within a few hours. If it doesn’t, contact your dentist.

Bleeding

Your dentist may place a gauze pack on the extraction site to limit bleeding. This will also help a blood clot to form, which is necessary for normal healing. This gauze pack should be left in place for 30 to 45 minutes after you leave the dentist’s office. Do not chew on the pack. There may be some bleeding or oozing after the pack is removed. If so, here’s what to do:

  • Fold a piece of clean gauze into a pad thick enough to bite on. Dampen the pad with clean, warm water and place it directly on the extraction site.
  • Apply pressure by closing the teeth firmly over the pad. Maintain this pressure for about 30 minutes. If the pad becomes soaked with blood, replace it with a clean one.
  • Do not suck on the extraction site or disturb it with your tongue.
  • A slight amount of blood may leak from the extraction site until a clot forms. However, if heavy bleeding continues, call your dentist. (Remember, though, that a little bit of blood mixed with saliva can look like a lot of bleeding.)

Do Not Disturb!

The blood clot that forms in the tooth socket is an important part of the normal healing process. You should avoid doing things that might disturb the clot. Here’s how to protect it:

  • Do not rinse your mouth vigorously, or drink through a straw for 24 hours. These activities create suction in the mouth, which could loosen the clot and delay healing.
  • Avoid alcoholic beverages or mouthwash containing alcohol for 24 hours.
  • If you are a smoker, talk to your dentist before the surgery on ways to quit. You should not smoke after surgery.
  • Limit strenuous activity for 24 hours after the extraction. This will reduce bleeding and help the blood clot to form.
  • Sometimes the blood clot does not form in the first day or two after the extraction, or it forms but breaks down. The result is called dry socket. This can be very painful and should be reported to your dentist. A dressing may be placed in the socket to protect it until the socket heals and to reduce any pain.

Cleaning Your Mouth

Do not clean the teeth next to the healing tooth socket for the rest of the day. You should, however, brush and floss your other teeth well and begin cleaning the teeth next to the healing tooth socket the next day. You can also brush your tongue. This will help get rid of the bad breath and unpleasant taste that are common after an extraction.
The day after the extraction, gently rinse your mouth with warm salt water (half a teaspoon salt in an 8 oz. glass of warm water) after meals to keep food particles out of the extraction site. Try not to rinse your mouth vigorously, as this may loosen the blood clot. If you have hypertension, discuss with your dentist whether you should rinse with salt water. Avoid using a mouthwash during this early healing period unless your dentist advises you to do so.

Medication

If your dentist has prescribed medicine to control pain and inflammation, or to prevent infection, use it only as directed. If the pain medication prescribed does not seem to work for you, do not take more pills or take them more often than directed—call your dentist.

Swelling and Pain

After a tooth is removed, you may have some discomfort and notice some swelling. This is normal. To help reduce swelling and pain, try applying an ice bag or cold, moist cloth to your face. Your dentist may give you specific instructions on how long and how often to use a cold compress.

When to Call the Dentist

  • fever, nausea or vomiting
  • ongoing or severe pain, swelling, or bleeding
  • pain that gets worse with time instead of better

If you have any of the following issues, call your dentist immediately. If you cannot reach your dentist, go to a hospital emergency room.

Eating and Drinking

Eating & Drinking After a Tooth Extraction After the extraction, drink lots of liquids and eat soft, nutritious foods. Avoid hot liquids and alcoholic beverages. Do not use a straw. Begin eating solid foods the next day or as soon as you can chew comfortably. For the first few days, try to chew food on the side opposite the extraction site. When it feels comfortable, you should resume chewing on both sides of your mouth.

Follow-Up

If you have sutures that require removal, your dentist will tell you when to return to the office.

Tooth Fillings

Most people need at least one tooth filling in their lifetime. Dental fillings are most commonly used to treat cavities, but they’re also used to repair cracked or broken teeth, or teeth that have been worn down over time.
Most dental filling procedures feature the following:

    • Topical anesthetic to numb the area of treatment
    • Decay removal from the affected teeth
    • Tooth restoration using a composite (white fillings only)
    • Bite check to make sure your teeth align comfortably

The team at Hosek Dentistry will ensure you are comfortable before, during, and after your procedure, and will happily to answer any questions you may have. In addition, here are useful tips for overcoming dental anxiety.

Cracked Tooth

A tooth that is cracked can be painful. It also can lead to disease of the tooth.
How do you know if you have a cracked tooth? Look for these signs:

  • sharp pain when biting down that quickly disappears
  • pain that comes and goes
  • pain when eating or drinking
  • feeling that something is stuck between your teeth

Or you may have no signs at all.

How Can You Tell if a Tooth is Cracked?

It can be hard for you to tell if a tooth is cracked. If you have pain, you may not be able to tell which tooth hurts or whether the pain is from an upper or a lower tooth. Cracks sometimes are invisible to the eye and may not show up on an x-ray. And sometimes you won’t have any pain or sensitivity at all; your dentist will discover it during your exam.
If you are having symptoms, you can help your dentist find the cracked tooth by sharing some information:

  • the things that cause you tooth pain (such as heat, cold or foods that are sweet, sour or sticky)
  • the area of the pain

Why Does a Tooth Crack?

A tooth may crack for many reasons, such as the following:

  • chewing on hard objects or foods such as pencils, ice, nuts or hard candy
  • an accident, such as a blow to the mouth
  • grinding or clenching of teeth
  • uneven chewing pressure, especially if a nearby tooth is lost
  • loss of tooth structure through wear
  • loss of tooth structure due to large fillings or other restorations
  • exposure of tooth enamel to extreme hot and cold temperatures

Why Does a Cracked Tooth Hurt?

Sometimes, a crack in the enamel travels through to the nerve pulp. This type of cracked tooth may hurt when you bite down or when you stop biting. The crack may be too small to see, but when it opens, the pulp inside the tooth may become irritated. The pulp is soft tissue inside the center of the tooth that contains the nerves and blood vessels. If the crack extends into the pulp, the tooth may become sensitive to extreme heat and cold.
The pulp also can be affected as a result of the crack. If this happens, endodontic (root canal) treatment may be needed to save the tooth.

How is a Cracked Tooth Treated?

Treatment depends on the size, location and direction of the crack, as well as your symptoms. Your dentist will talk with you about the treatment that is best for your tooth. It is possible that your dentist will recommend no treatment at all, since tiny cracks are common and usually do not cause problems.

Types of treatment include the following:

  • repairing the tooth with a filling material
  • placing a crown (cap) on the tooth to protect it from further damage
  • endodontic (root canal) treatment if the pulp is involved
  • extracting the tooth if it is severely cracked and cannot be saved

Regular dental checkups are important, because they let your dentist diagnose and treat problems at an early stage. A cracked tooth can become a bigger problem if left untreated. If you think you may have a cracked tooth, visit your dentist.

What is a Root Canal?

Root canals are common procedures and can help save your tooth from extraction. Dentists at Aspen Dental practices have been safely and expertly performing root canal procedures for over two decades.

We can help with any concerns, questions, or anxiety you may feel about your upcoming root canal. In addition, here are useful tips for overcoming dental anxiety.

According to the American Dental Association:

Root Canal Treatment

Your teeth are meant to last a lifetime. Years ago, diseased or injured teeth were usually pulled. But today, a tooth can often be saved through root canal (endodontic) treatment.

Endodontics (en-do-DON-tics) is the branch of dentistry that deals with treating diseases or injuries to the dental pulp. An endodontist is a dentist who specializes in root canal and other endodontic treatments.

Diagram of a Healthy Tooth

tooth_diagram_english

What happens if the dental pulp is injured?

The pulp is soft tissue inside the tooth that contains blood vessels and nerves. When the pulp becomes inflamed or infected, treatment is needed. The most common causes of pulp inflammation or infection are a cracked or chipped tooth, a deep cavity or filling, or other serious injury to the tooth. All of these can allow bacteria to enter the pulp.

Why should the pulp be removed?

If damaged or infected pulp is not removed, the tissues around the root of the tooth can become infected. Pain and swelling often result. Even if there is no pain, bacteria can damage the bone that holds the tooth in the jaw. Without treatment, the tooth may have to be removed.

Removing a tooth can create problems

When a tooth is removed and not replaced, the teeth around it may shift. This can make biting and chewing difficult and may make it harder to clean your teeth. Areas that are not cleaned well are more likely to get gum disease.
Root canal treatment can prevent these problems by saving your natural tooth. Also, root canal treatment is usually less expensive than a replacement tooth.

What does treatment involve?

Root canal treatment may involve one or more dental visits. Your dentist or endodontist will perform the necessary steps to save your tooth:

  • First, your tooth is numbed for your comfort. A thin sheet of latex rubber is placed over your tooth to keep it dry. An opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.
  • The tooth’s nerve, or pulp, is removed from the pulp chamber and root canal (the space inside the root). Each root canal is cleaned and shaped so it can be filled.
  • Your dentist may place medicine in the pulp chamber and root canal to help get rid of bacteria.
  • The root canals are usually filled with a rubber-like material to seal them.
  • A temporary filling is then placed in the tooth to prevent contamination of the root canals. You might be given antibiotics if the infection has spread beyond the end of the root(s). If your dentist prescribes medicine, use it only as directed. If you have any problems with the medicine, call your dentist.
  • During the next stage of treatment, the dentist removes the temporary filling and restores the tooth with a crown or a filling to strengthen it and improve the way it looks. If an endodontist performs the root canal treatment, he or she usually recommends that you return to your general dentist for this step.

Tooth decay can cause an abscess (infection).

The decay is removed and an opening is made through the crown of the tooth into the pulp chamber.

The pulp is removed and the root canals are cleaned and shaped.

The root canals and pulp chamber are filled.

A metal or plastic rod or post may be placed in the root canal to help retain the core (filling) material, which supports the restoration (crown).

The tooth is then restored with a crown or filling.

What materials are used for the crown?

Crowns can be made from several materials. The type chosen depends on where the tooth is located in your mouth, the amount of natural tooth left, your preferences and your dentist’s judgment about what is best for you.

How long will the restored tooth last?

When properly restored, a tooth with a root canal filling can last for many years. But, like any other tooth, it can become decayed or fractured or the tissue around it can get gum disease. Daily cleanings and regular dental exams will help keep your mouth healthy, whether you’ve had root canal treatment or not.

What is a crown?

A crown is a cover or “cap” your dentist can put on a tooth. The crown restores the tooth to its normal shape, size and function. The purpose of a crown is to make the tooth stronger or improve the way it looks.
Why do I need a crown?

You may need a crown if you:

  • have a cavity that is too large for a filling
  • have a missing tooth and need a bridge
  • need to cover a dental implant
  • have a tooth that is cracked, worn down or otherwise weakened
  • have had root canal treatment—the crown will protect the restored tooth
  • want to cover a discolored or badly shaped tooth and improve your smile!

What is it made from?

Crowns are made from several types of materials. Metal alloys, ceramics, porcelain, composite resin, or combinations of these materials may be used. In the process of making a crown, the material often is colored to blend in with your natural teeth.

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Your dentist wants to create a crown that looks natural and fits comfortably in your mouth. To decide on the material for your crown, your dentist will consider the tooth location, the position of the gum tissue, the patient’s preference, the amount of tooth that shows when you smile, the color or shade of the tooth, and the function of the tooth.

How is a crown placed?

Several steps are involved, and two dental visits are generally needed to complete the treatment.

  • The dentist prepares the tooth by removing its outer portion so the crown will fit. Any decay is also removed. If additional tooth structure is needed to support the crown, the dentist may build up the core of the tooth.
  • An impression is made to provide an exact model for the crown.
  • You will get a temporary crown while you wait for the permanent crown to be ready—usually less than two weeks. While you have the temporary crown, this tooth may be sensitive to hot and cold. Also, avoid chewing gum or sticky foods during this time.
  • The dentist or a laboratory technician then uses the model to help make the crown.
  • When the new crown is ready, the dentist places it in your mouth and makes the necessary adjustments. When you and your dentist are satisfied with how it looks and feels, the crown is cemented in place.

Dental Crowns

Dental crowns are a secure way to fill gaps and help restore your smile if you have missing or damaged teeth. A crown can also help you bite and chew better, which can positively impact other systems in your body, such as a your digestive system.
Hosek dentistry offers a variety of handcrafted crown styles. Your dentist will help you determine what crown is best for you based on your budget, aesthetic preferences, and your body chemistry.

According to the American Dental Association:

Before crown: Worn filling with decay and broken cusp

Crown is placed over prepared tooth

After crown placement

Caring for your teeth

To prevent damage to a crown, there are a few things you can do:

    • Brush twice a day and floss once a day to remove plaque, a sticky film of bacteria. Look for oral care products that have the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products that display the Seal have met the American Dental Association’s standards for safety and effectiveness.
    • Avoid chewing hard foods, ice or other hard objects, such as pencils. This is especially important for tooth-colored crowns.
    • Be sure to see your dentist for regular exams and professional teeth cleanings.

Dental Bridge

A dental bridge will hold your other teeth in place and make everyday activities such as eating and talking easier. It can also help preserve your teeth as a lost tooth can cause the remaining teeth to loosen, which may lead to additional tooth loss.

Hosek Dentistry offers a range of handcrafted dental bridges, from budget-friendly options to state-of-the-art zirconium bridges created with 3D technology. Your dentist will recommend the best bridge options for you and the team at Hosek Dentistry will partner with you every step of the way.

According to the American Dental Association:

What Is a Bridge?

A bridge is a replacement tooth or teeth that fill the space where one or more teeth are missing. The bridge restores your bite and helps keep the natural shape of your face.

Before you get a bridge, your dentist wants you to know more about the steps involved. He or she can advise which type of bridge is best for you.
Why Do I Need a Bridge?

A missing tooth is a serious matter. Teeth are made to work together. When you lose a tooth, the nearby teeth may tilt or drift into the empty space. The teeth in the opposite jaw may also shift up or down toward the space. This can affect your bite and place more stress on your teeth and jaw joints, possibly causing pain.

Teeth that have tipped or drifted are also harder to clean. This puts them at a higher risk for tooth decay and gum disease.
When a tooth is missing, the bone may shrink. If that happens, it may change the way the jawbone supports the lips and cheeks. Over time, this can make your face look older.

Position of teeth immediately after a tooth is lost If the tooth is not replaced, other teeth can drift out of position and change the bite.

How Do I Replace a Tooth?

Placing a bridge usually takes more than one dental visit. On the first visit, your dentist prepares the teeth on both sides of the gap. He or she will later attach the bridge to these teeth.

Your dentist then takes an impression or an image of your teeth and the space and sends it to a dental laboratory. Technicians at the lab make the bridge. Your dentist will place a temporary bridge to protect your prepared teeth while you are waiting for the permanent bridge.

When the permanent bridge is ready, the dentist fits, adjusts and cements the bridge to the prepared teeth. This type of bridge is permanent and cannot be taken out of your mouth without a dentist’s help.

Fixed Bridge Placement

Do I need implants?

Dental implants may be used to support a bridge when several teeth are missing. Implants are posts that are surgically placed into the jaw. Over time, the bone grows around the implants to hold them in place.

  • A key benefit of implants is that they don’t need support from the surrounding teeth.
  • Candidates for dental implants should be in good general health and have enough bone to support an implant. For some patients, implants help preserve the jawbone where teeth have been lost.
  • Implants may be placed in one day or might require multiple visits depending on your dentist’s treatment plan.
  • A key benefit of implants is that they don’t need support from the surrounding teeth.
  • Candidates for dental implants should be in good general health and have enough bone to support an implant. For some patients, implants help preserve the jawbone where teeth have been lost.
  • Implants may be placed in one day or might require multiple visits depending on your dentist’s treatment plan.

Implant-Supported Bridge

What Materials Are Used in a Bridge?

Bridges are made from metal, ceramics (porcelain) or a combination of the two. Ceramics often are bonded to a metal alloy. Your dentist will talk with you about the materials that are best for you and your mouth.
Caring for Your Bridge

A bridge can fail if the support teeth or the jawbone is damaged by dental disease. Follow these tips for good oral health:

  • Brush your teeth twice a day and floss or use another between-the-teeth cleaner once a day. Brushing and cleaning between the teeth helps remove plaque, a sticky film of bacteria that is always forming on the teeth.
  • Always clean between your teeth and under the bridge. There are many kinds of flossers, picks or little brushes—ask your dentist what type will work well with your bridge.
  • See your dentist regularly for exams and professional cleanings.
  • Eat a healthy diet.
  • Look for oral care products that have the ADA Seal of Acceptance. Products that display the Seal have met the American Dental Association’s standards for safety and effectiveness.

Looking for an alternative to metal braces?

banner-v6-largeClearCorrect is the clear and simple choice. No wires. No brackets. Just clear, convenient comfort—every reason to smile.

With ClearCorrect, your dentist or orthodontist can straighten your teeth using a series of clear, custom, removable aligners. Each aligner moves your teeth just a little bit at a time until you eventually get straight teeth.

How does it work?

You and your doctor will evaluate your teeth and talk about any problems or goals you have for your smile. Once you and your doctor establish ClearCorrect is the right treatment option for you, your doctor will take impressions, photos, and x-rays of your teeth that ClearCorrect uses in manufacturing your custom aligners. Then your doctor writes a prescription for your custom aligners and sends it to ClearCorrect.

What can it do?

ClearCorrect can treat a wide variety of issues that keep people from achieving their ideal smiles. Straighter teeth don’t just look better; they work better too. Poorly-aligned teeth can interfere with bite function, wear out quicker, and are more prone to cavities. Ask your doctor how ClearCorrect can help you.

What are dentures?

denture-collection-300x297
When a person is missing teeth, he or she may experience a variety of problems. The person may become less confident in their smile and have difficulty speaking and eating certain foods.

Dentures are appliances that are custom made to replace a person’s missing teeth and restore the appearance and oral functions that were lost.
The denture can be either a full denture or a partial denture.

A full denture is used when all of the person’s teeth are missing and a partial denture is used when only some of the teeth are missing.

What are the different types of dentures?

original_original_upper_all_on_4Complete Dentures: Complete dentures are made of a plastic base that is colored in order to replicate gum tissue and supports a full set of plastic or porcelain teeth. The traditional full denture is held in the mouth by forming a seal with the gums. They can also be held in place by attaching to dental implants that are surgically placed in the bone of the jaws. This treatment is much more expensive than the traditional complete denture.

Partial Dentures: Partial dentures can either be made with a plastic base or a metal framework that supports the number of teeth that need to be replaced. It is held in the mouth by using clasps and rests that are carefully adapted around the natural teeth. The partial denture that uses a metal framework is the traditional design, due to the rigidity and strength of the metal. Plastic partial dentures have normally been used as emergency or temporary replacements of missing teeth, allowing the gums and bone to heal before a definitive restorative solution is obtained. Recently, however, various materials such as Valplast have been developed to provide durable, flexible alternatives in certain situations.

Dental Implants

Dental implants can help you smile more confidently. A dental implant is permanent and is an effective, attractive, secure way to fill gaps in your smile—all while preserving your existing teeth.

Dental Implants

Dental implants are an effective way to replace missing teeth. When teeth are lost because of disease or an accident, dental implants may be a good option. You may want to choose dental implants if you:

    • Hide your smile because you have missing teeth
    • Wear dentures that are uncomfortable
    • Are dissatisfied with your removable partial dentures
    • Want to keep your other teeth intact

Many people choose implants to replace a single tooth or several teeth, or to support a full set of dentures. Implants are posts surgically placed into the upper or lower jawbone. They replace the root of one or more missing teeth.

Dental implants are made of titanium (a strong, lightweight metal) and other materials that are well accepted by the body. More than 5 million implants are placed each year by dentists in the United States.

Benefits of Dental Implants

  • Implants offer firm support to man-made teeth. Dentures, bridges or single teeth attached to the implants won’t slip or shift in your mouth-a very important benefit when eating and speaking.
  • This secure fit also helps man-made teeth feel more natural than typical bridges or dentures.
  • Some people may find implant-supported dentures more comfortable than dentures that do not use implants.
  • Where teeth are missing, dental implants also help keep the jawbone from shrinking.
  • Implants are a good value, because they can last a lifetime with good care.

Single Tooth Implants

The single tooth implant replaces the missing tooth’s roots. A single tooth implant is a stand-alone unit and does not involve treating the teeth next to it.

If you are missing one or more teeth, there are many reasons why you should replace them:

  • You may not like how the gap looks when you smile.
  • Missing teeth may affect how you speak.
  • A missing molar tooth can make it harder to chew.
  • When a tooth is lost and not replaced, the teeth around it can shift.
  • Bone loss can occur around the missing tooth. This may cause the remaining teeth to become loose over time.
  • Loss of teeth and bone can make your face sag. You may look older.

Implant-Supported Bridges and Dentures

Dental implants can be used to support a bridge when several teeth are missing. The implant-supported bridge replaces the lost natural teeth and some of the tooth roots. Unlike traditional bridges, an implant-supported bridge does not need support from the teeth next to it.

If you are missing all of your teeth, an implant-supported denture can replace the missing teeth and some of the tooth roots. Because the dental implants integrate (or “fuse”) with the jawbone, an implant-supported denture tends to be comfortable and stable, allowing you to bite and chew naturally.

What Is Involved in Implant Placement?

Many kinds of implants are available. Treatment can take only one day, or it can take several months, or somewhere in between. Your dentist and you can discuss which type of implant is best for you.

Implant treatment usually involves three basic steps:

Placement of the Implant

Your dentist will carefully locate where the implant should be placed, using x-rays or other pictures. Then the dentist surgically places the implant into the jawbone. You may have some swelling and/or tenderness after surgery. Your dentist may prescribe pain medicine to ease the discomfort. During the healing process, your dentist may tell you to eat soft foods.

Healing Process

What makes an implant so strong is that the jawbone grows around it and holds it in place. This process, called osseointegration (OSS-e-o-in-te-GRAY-shun), takes time. It may be several months before the implant is completely integrated into the bone. Then the patient can get the permanent replacement tooth or teeth. In many cases, the implant and temporary replacement teeth can be placed in one visit.

Placement of the Prosthesis (Replacement Tooth or Teeth)

For a single tooth implant, the dentist custom-makes a new tooth for you, called a dental crown. It is designed to look just like your other teeth. Implant-supported bridges and dentures are also custom-made to look like natural teeth and to fit your mouth. The replacement teeth are attached to the implant posts.

Replacement teeth usually take some time to make. In the meantime, your dentist may give you a temporary crown, bridge or denture. This will help you eat and speak normally until the permanent replacement teeth are ready.

Who Is a Good Candidate for Dental Implants?

If you are in good general health and your jaw can support an implant, this treatment may be a good option for you. Your health is more important than your age.

However, implants are not an option for everyone.
Patients should be in good health or cleared by their physicians before scheduling any implant surgery. They should have enough jawbone to support the implant or be able to have surgery to build up the jawbone. Bone can be built up with a bone graft or with sinus lift surgery.
Chronic illnesses, such as diabetes and leukemia, may slow healing after surgery. Implant treatment may not be a good option for patients with these illnesses. Tobacco use also can slow the healing process.

If your dentist does recommend implant treatment, careful oral hygiene is essential for the success of the implant. You must spend time caring for the implant and making sure the area around it is very clean. If not, you might increase your risk for gum disease, which can weaken the bone and tissues needed to support the implant.